Kabocha Squash 101: Where to Buy It And How to Use It

Kabocha Squash 101: Where to Buy It And How to Use It

Kabocha squash, also known as Japanese pumpkin, is a staple ingredient in Japanese cuisine prized for its sweetness, velvety texture, health benefits, and versatility.

If you often go to Japanese restaurants, then you’ve probably enjoyed kabocha squash dipped in tempura batter and fried, or slow-simmered in hot pots or soups. It’s similar to a regular pumpkin in terms of appearance, but it’s closer to a sweet potato in terms of flavor and texture.

In this article, I’m going to show you in which aisle you’re most likely to find kabocha squash, as well as which stores are more likely to have it available. Finally, I’ll also provide you with two recipes that use kabocha squash.

Where to Find Kabocha Squash in the Grocery Store

Kabocha squash, like other vegetables and fruits, is usually located in the produce aisle, next to or close to the butternut squash, especially if you’re looking for whole, fresh kabocha squash.

kabocha squash in grocerys stores
Picture of kabocha squash

You can spot the differences between kabocha squash and butternut squash by looking at the image above.

The butternut squash is orange-colored and cylindrical with a bulb-shaped end, while the kabocha squash is usually green and has a more round shape, similar to a regular pumpkin. 

Kabocha squash is also available in bright red color, so keep that in mind when searching for it in grocery stores.

What Stores Have Kabocha Squash Available?

  • Amazon: Amazon is hands-down the best place online to purchase any product, including exotic fruits and vegetables. They have whole kabocha squash, as well as kabocha squash seeds.
  • Walmart: Visiting Walmart’s physical store is also a good idea if you’re looking for fresh kabocha squash, however, I did not find kabocha squash selling on their online store.
  • Whole Foods: If you want to find any type of produce (and touch it with your hands), Whole Foods is probably the best place to do so. They usually have kabocha squash, though it may not be true for every location.
  • Asian Market: Since the kabocha squash is of Japanese origin it’s likely to be available in Asian markets In fact, it’s probably where you’re most likely to find it.
  • Kroger: Kroger is also a supermarket that may have kabocha squash available in the produce area, but it does not come up on their website.
  • Safeway: Look for kabocha squash in the produce area. According to their website, they also have organic kabocha squash available.
  • Trader Joe’s: Trader Joe’s also seem to have organic kabocha squash available, so you should also be able to find regular kabocha squash.

Unique Recipes Containing Kabocha Squash

Roasted Kabocha Squash

roasted kabocha squash

You don’t need to be an excellent chef to reproduce this recipe, but I can assure you, it’s quite delicious.

Ingredients: 1 medium kabocha squash, 2 tablespoons olive oil, avocado oil, or melted coconut oil, kosher salt, and freshly ground black pepper.

If you want to learn how to roast kabocha squash, you can check out Nom Nom Paleo.

Roasted Kabocha Squash Soup

roasted kabocha squash soup

Like any type of squash, kabocha squash can be used to make a delicious and highly nutritious soup.

Ingredients: 1/2 large kabocha squash (seeded), 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil, salt, 1 1/2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil, 2 cups of chopped or sliced onions, 2 ribs of sliced celery, 3 cloves of chopped garlic, 1 1/2-inch piece of peeled fresh ginger root, 1 1/4 teaspoon of ground cumin, 1/2 teaspoon of ground coriander, 4 cups of vegetable stock, 2 teaspoons of kosher salt, 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper, garnish with lime juice and chopped fresh cilantro.

If you want to know how to make this recipe, check out the website Simply Recipes.


This post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no additional cost to you, if you purchase through these links. See my full disclosure here.

Alexandre Valente

Hey there! My name is Alex and I've been vegan for more than three years! I've set up this blog because I'm really passionate about veganism and living a more eco-conscious life. Hopefully, I can use this website as a channel to help you out on your own journey!

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